Bullitt County History

The Hubers and Cassedays of Huber's Station

by Charles Hartley

In February 1866, James Henry Huber purchased 333 acres of land along the Louisville and Nashville railroad in Bullitt County from the estate of Charles Q. Armstrong who had died in Atlanta, Georgia in 1862.[1] Due to some confusion about the land's title, Huber did not actually finish paying for it until 1874,[2] but that didn't keep him from moving his family to the land before that.

Huber didn't waste any time in establishing a railroad depot on his property. Railroad records indicate that a new depot, named Huber's Station, was built during the fiscal year ending in June 1871.[3]

The 1870 census found Huber with his extended family living on the land. They included both Hubers and Cassedays.[4] In this article we will take a look at the two families, at how they were connected, and what became of them.

At the time of that census, James Henry Huber was a bank cashier with a wife and seven children at home. Alexander A. Casseday was a businessman with a wife and five children living at home. Also in the census household were three farm laborers, three domestic servants, and the infant child of one of the servants.

James Huber and Alexander Casseday had been acquainted since at least 1857 when they were both members of a local military company called the Citizen Guards which was organized in Louisville in that year. Casseday was a first lieutenant and Huber was the orderly sergeant.[5]

The Hubers

We will look at the Huber family first with a look at James Henry Huber himself.

He was born in Shelby County, the son of a prominent Presbyterian minister. He entered business as a clerk in the office of an iron furnace at Shepherdsville and became, after a few years, bookkeeper for the firm. He came to Louisville while a young man and in time became a partner in the music and instrument house of D. P. Faulds & Co. He sold out his interests there to enlist in the Mexican war. He served one year and received honorable mention for gallant service before Monterey. Returning from the war he engaged in business with Lawton & Co., china ware dealers, and at the breaking out of the civil war was a clerk for Hamilton & Co., port packers. He was a strong Southern partisan, but did not enlist. The firm with which he was connected established a banking house and Mr. Huber was placed in charge of the business. He continued to be Cashier after the bank of Hamilton & Co. became the People's Bank of Kentucky.[6]

James first married Abbie G. Mason in 1848 in Jefferson County KY.[7] Their marriage record identifies her father as Johnson Mason. We have no other information about her ancestry.

Abbie Mason Huber died in 1861, and is buried at Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville.[8] According to cemetery records she was buried on 23 Oct 1861.

The first census record we have for James and Abbie Huber is in 1850 in Louisville.[9] There he was a bookkeeper and they as yet had no children.

However, by 1860 Abbie had given birth to 2 sons (Louis and Jay), and 2 daughters (Bertha and Harriet). Also living with them was Joseph Huber, age 24, who we assume to be James' brother. James' occupation was listed as a music dealer.[10]

This was just prior to the beginning of the Civil War, and we find a notation on the Internet that Lena Lyle of Tennessee wrote the words to "Song of the South," a Confederate song, and James H. Huber of Kentucky set them to music. It was published in 1861.[11]

James and Abbie had one more daughter before her death. The 1870 census lists an Abbey M. Huber, age 8, in the household.

James Henry Huber next married Henrietta Douglas on 26 Apr 1864, also in Jefferson County.[12] Henrietta was born in Tennessee in April 1837 to Henry Lightfoot and Mary Brandon (Hall) Douglass. Henry Douglass died before 25 Mar 1845, for on that day Mary married Alexander Addison Casseday in Sumner County TN.[13] Here lies the connection between the two families. James Henry Huber married Alexander Casseday's step-daughter.

James and Henrietta had six children: Mary, William Samuel, Emeline, Henrietta, Jennie, and Paul whom we will discuss later.

Of the children of James and Abbie Huber, their first, named Louis C. Huber, was born in October 1851.[14] He married Sallie Daisy Wilcox on 4 Oct 1882 in Bullitt County.[15] She was a daughter of John E. and Mary (Looney) Wilcox.[16]

Louis and Sallie had four children, as noted in the 1900 census. Their first was named Eldon A. Huber who was born in September 1883. He appears with his parents in that census, but we lose track of him after that.

Their second was a daughter they named Abby M. Huber who was born in July 1885. She married Bolling H. Holt on 16 Mar 1910 in Jefferson County,[17] but moved with him back to his home in Montgomery County, Alabama where they appeared in the 1910 census along with his mother.[18] Bolling and Abby had two children: Louise who was born about 1913, and Bolling Jr. who was born about 1915.[19] We find the family in the 1930 census, living in Montgomery with their two children. Bolling Sr. was the superintendent of the city sanitation department at the time.[20]

Louis and Sallie's next child was a daughter they named Louise F. Huber. The 1900 census gives her birth as April 1888, but her death record indicates that she was 69 when she died on 15 Mar 1959 in Montgomery, Alabama,[21] which would make her birth year 1889. She married J. Morris Jones, probably about 1913 based on their 1930 census record,[22] and they had a son they named Earl Carson Jones who was born about 1915.[23]

Lillian Steele Huber was Louis and Sallie's final child. She was born 18 Aug 1891, married Lannie S. Jamison on 18 Aug 1909 in Jefferson County,[24] had two children: Frank L. and Doris F. Jamison,[25] and died on 9 Sep 1921.[26] We lose track of Lannie and his daughter Doris, but Frank Jamison was living with his Aunt Abby Holt in the 1930 census.

Louis and Sallie Huber followed some of their children to Montgomery, Alabama where Louis died 28 Jun 1919,[27] and Sallie followed on 6 Mar 1921.[28]

James and Abbie Huber's second child was a daughter they named Bertha. She was born about 1856, and married William A. Casseday in Waco, Texas on 18 Jun 1873.[29] William was a son of Alexander and Mary Casseday, another connection between the Huber and Casseday families.

William and Bertha had a daughter they named Etta. Then Bertha died sometime before December 1882, for in that month William was married again.[30] Etta Casseday married Almon Axtell sometime after 1900, but soon died on 10 Nov 1907.[31]

James and Abbie's third child was Harriet Huber who was born in 1857. Harriet never married. She died in Montgomery, Alabama on 11 Mar 1931.[32]

Their next child was Jay H. Huber who was born about 1859. We have located what we believe to be him in Eastland County, Texas in the 1880 census, working as a clerk in a sawmill.[33] We next find him in 1884, working as a bookkeeper in the bank where his father was cashier;[34] and later in 1890 he is identified as a bookkeeper living at Huber Station.[35] At the time of his father's death, he was a bookkeeper for Maury & Dodd, Louisville architects. He apparently died before 10 Nov 1907 for he was buried at Cave Hill Cemetery on that date.

As noted before, James and Abbie's last child was Abbey M. Huber. One ancestry tree gives her birth as 6 Oct 1861 and her death as 13 Oct 1889.[36] We do know she married William L. Lewis in Jefferson County on 16 Dec 1885.[37] Not long after her marriage to William Lewis, she died and was buried in the Lexington Cemetery in Lexington KY on 15 Oct 1889.[38]

Turning to the children of James and Henrietta Huber, their first was a daughter named Mary T. Huber who was born in 1867. Mary married Francis J. Hagan on 2 May 1900 in Bullitt County.[39] Francis was a son of Francis and Zerilda (Sloan) Hagan.[40,41] Both men were also known as Frank Hagan.

Mary's husband was killed in August 1904.[42] They were in the process of selling their Bullitt County land and moving to Montgomery, Alabama where this occurred, and Mary lived in Montgomery the rest of her life. She died there 1 Apr 1936.[43] They had no children.

James and Henrietta's second child was William Samuel Huber who was born about 1868 and who was 20 years old when he died.[6] He was a tutor at Male High School at the time of his death.

Next born was Emeline Casseday Huber, born 15 Sep 1870. Emeline, sometimes called Emma or Emily, married Peter Baxter Henderlite about 1897. Peter was a Presbyterian minister, and they were living in Mitchell County, Texas in 1900,[44] and in Elizabeth City, Virginia in 1910.[45] Census records show she had one child who died young. They were living in Tucumcari, New Mexico when she died on 23 Nov 1919.[46]

James and Henrietta's fourth child was a daughter they named for her mother. Henrietta Douglass Huber was born about 1873. She married Robert Gordon Matheson, a presbyterian minister, on 6 Oct 1897 in Bullitt County.[47] His ministerial duties took them to Virginia and North Carolina. They had three sons they named Gordon, Douglass, and Donald.[48] Henrietta Matheson died in North Carolina on 4 Mar 1952.[49]

Jennie Huber was the next child born to James and Henrietta. She was born in January 1876. We know that she was an invalid for her mother made arrangements for her care as part of a deed of property to her eldest daughter, Mary Hagan.[50] Jennie died in April 1904 and is buried in the family plot at Cave Hill.

James and Henrietta's last child was Paul D. Huber who was born in December 1879. Little is known about him other than he died on 13 Aug 1892[51] and is buried with the family at Cave Hill.

James Henry Huber was killed in an accident on 27 Apr 1894. According to his death record, his parents were James and Martha Huber; James born in Switzerland, and Martha born in Pennsylvania.[52]

According to the newspaper report of his death, he was struck by a locomotive and killed while walking on the tracks near his home. He had lately been attacked by softening of the brain [known today as encephalomalacia]. It is thought by his family that he was not really himself at the time of the accident.[6]

Henrietta Huber died 27 Dec 1900. It was reported in the Waco TX newspaper which identified both her mother, Mrs. Mary B. Casseday, and her sister, Bertha (wife of W. A. Casseday).[53]

The Cassedays

Returning to the family of Alexander Addison Casseday, Alexander and his brother Samuel Casseday came to Louisville as young men in the early 1800's, and both became businessmen. While Samuel remained in Louisville for the rest of his life, Alexander moved to Nashville, Tennessee in 1828 to begin business there.[54]

There he married Emeline Louise Cantrell in 1831.[55] They had two daughters, Mary Eliza and Emma Casseday. Emeline died sometime after Emma's birth in 1841. Then Alexander married Mary Brandon Hall Douglass in 1845 in Sumner County TN.[56] Mary Douglass was the widow of Henry L. Douglass with whom she had a daughter named Henrietta. Mary was born in December 1819, a daughter of William and Mary Brandon (Alexander) Hall. She and Alexander Casseday had three children: William A., Samuel, and Jennie Hall Casseday.

Alexander brought his family back to Louisville in 1851 where they lived until joining the Hubers in Bullitt County. Then in January 1872 he moved with his family to Waco, Texas, where he died on 21 October 1880. His widow, Mary Casseday, lived until 15 Aug 1902 when she died in Waco at the residence of her son, William.[57]

Of their children, Alexander's, Mary's, and theirs together, we have the following information.

His daughter, Mary Eliza Cassaday was born in September 1836. She never married. When her parents moved to Texas, she remained in Kentucky where we find her in the 1900 census living with her half-sister, Henrietta Douglass Huber in Bullitt County.[58] She died in early February 1906, according to cemetery records, and is buried in the Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville.

His second daughter, Emma Casseday, was born in 1841 in Tennessee. She went with her parents to Texas where she married Capt. John D. Morrow in 21 Oct 1880 in Waco.[59] She and John had a son they named William Samuel Morrow. William was born 10 Jan 1883.[60] Emma died 29 Jun 1926 in Waco, already a widow.[61]

Her daughter, Henrietta Douglass, married James Henry Huber, and is described above.

The first child born to Alexander and Mary was a son named William who was born in June 1847. William went to Texas with his parents, but chose a Kentucky girl for his bride when he married Bertha Huber, daughter of James and Abbie Huber. They had a daughter named Etta Casseday, as noted earlier. After Bertha died, William married Corine Lochridge on 14 Dec 1882.30 William and Corine had six children: Pattie, Mary, Lizzie, William, Alexander and Albert. William died on 1 Jun 1903 in Waco.[62]

Alexander and Mary's second son was Samuel Casseday who was born 18 May 1848 in Tennessee and died 9 Dec 1914 in Bullitt County.[63] He married Sallie Eastham Kelly in Bardstown on 18 Oct 1870,[64] and they had two children, Samuel and Mignon.

The younger Samuel was born in December 1884.[65] He married Sue Brown in Davidson County, Tennessee on 21 Dec 1912,[66] and they moved to Springfield, Massachusetts where he began working in the construction trade. He died sometime prior to 1920, for in that census year Sue is listed as a widow.[67]

Mignon Casseday married Frederick T. Ley about 1903, and they first lived in Springfield, Massachusetts. Ley was in the construction trade, and developed his own company, first in New England, and later in New York City. His company built the Chrysler Building in New York City, which at the time of its construction was the tallest building in the world.[68]

Frederick and Mignon had three children: Frederic Alexander, Theodore, and Mignon.

Samuel Casseday, Sr. became the president of the National Book of Commerce in Louisville and served in that capacity until his death.[69]

Alexander and Mary's last child was a daughter, Jennie Hall Casseday. Jennie moved to Texas with her parents and there married Stephen Bedford Hamlett on 18 Jul 1872,[70] shortly after the family arrived in Waco.

Stephen and Jennie had one child, a son born 22 Jul 1875 that they named William Alexander,[71] before Jennie died 31 Aug 1877 in Waco.[72]

After Samuel Casseday's death in 1914, his widow moved to Louisville, and the era of the extended Huber-Casseday family at Huber's Station was over.

Footnotes

1. A History of Kentucky and Kentuckians: The Leaders and Representative Men in Commerce, Industry and Modern Activities, by E. Polk Johnson, Volume II, Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Co., 1912, pages 1098-1100.

2. "Charles Q. Armstrong (dec'd) Widow & Heirs to James H. Huber," Bullitt County Deed Book U, pages 154-157.

3. Annual Report of the Louisville & Nashville Railroad Company, 1870-71, Louisville: John P. Morton and Company, page 143

4. 1870 Federal Census: Kentucky, Bullitt County, Shepherdsville, page 9, household 51/50

5. History of the Ohio Falls Cities and Their Counties; Mt. Vernon IN: Windmill Publications, 1882

6. "J. H. Huber's Tragic Death," The Courier-Journal, 28 Apr 1894, page 12. [Link]

7. Family History Library (FHL) Collection: Kentucky Marriages, 1785-1979; Source Film Number: 482707; Reference Number: book 4, p 225

8. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=21538419

9. 1850 Federal Census: Kentucky, Jefferson County, Louisville District 2, page 181B, household 507/585

10. 1860 Federal Census: Kentucky, Jefferson County, Louisville Ward 8, page 269, household 1803/2223

11. http://www.tennrebgirl.com/cgi-bin/display_Items.asp?Cat=17&Sub=284

12. FHL Collection: Kentucky Marriages, 1785-1979; Source Film Number: 819619.

13. FHL Collection: Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1950; Source Film Number: 969847

14. 1900 Federal Census: Kentucky, Jefferson County, Louisville Ward 5, page 196A, household 20/27 - 1139 S. First Street

15. FHL Collection: Kentucky Marriages, 1785-1979; Source Film Number: 482699

16. FHL Collection: Alabama Deaths, 1908-1974; Film Number: 1908228

17. FHL Collection: Kentucky Marriages, 1785-1979; Source Film Number: 827337

18. 1910 Federal Census: Alabama, Montgomery County, Dooley, page 16A, household 241/241

19. 1920 Federal Census: Alabama, Montgomery County, Dooley, pages 174B-175A, household 244/244

20. 1930 Federal Census: Alabama, Montgomery County, Montgomery, District 24, page 130B, household 127/160 - 1101 Madison Avenue

21. FHL Collection: Alabama Deaths, 1908-1974; Film Number: 1908939

22. 1930 Federal Census: Alabama, Montgomery County, Montgomery, District 24, page 24B, household 556/686 - 820 Madison Avenue

23. 1920 Federal Census: Alabama, Montgomery County, Montgomery Ward 7, page 4B, household 87/88

24. FHL Collection: Kentucky Marriages, 1785-1979; Source Film Number: 826095

25. 1920 Federal Census: Kentucky, Jefferson County, Fern Creek, page 9B, farm household - lines 36-39

26. Lillian H. Jamison Death Certificate, KY 1921-19729

27. FHL Collection: Alabama Deaths, 1908-1974, Film Number: 1908212

28. FHL Collection: Alabama Deaths, 1908-1974, Film Number: 1908228

29. FHL Collection: Texas Marriages, 1837-1973; Source Film Number: 987554

30. FHL Collection: Texas Marriages, 1837-1973; Source Film Number: 956486

31. Waco Times-Herald, 1907: Mon., Nov. 11; transcribed on web page at http://www.txgenweb3.org/txmclennan/EWO/i%205-24-1906%20400-9-13-1908%20449.htm

32. FHL Collection: Alabama Deaths, 1908-1974; Film Number: 1908487

33. 1880 Federal Census: Texas, Eastland County, page 322A, household 319/319

34. Caron's Directory of the City of Louisville for 1884, page 386.

35. Caron's Directory of the City of Louisville for 1890.

36. http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/16253697/person/354060184?ssrc=

37. FHL Collection: Kentucky Marriages, 1785-1979; Source Film Number: 482715

38. Web page at http://lexcem.qx.net/gendetail.asp?id=48321&pg=1&ln=Lewis&fn=

39. FHL Collection: Kentucky Marriages, 1785-1979; Source Film Number: 482691

40. FHL Collection: Kentucky Marriages, 1785-1979; Source Film Number: 482496

41. 1880 Federal Census: Kentucky, Jefferson County, Louisville, District 125, page 413A, household 1/1

42. The Bullitt Pioneer, 12 Aug 1904, page 5

43. FHL Collection: Alabama Deaths, 1908-1974; Film Number: 190854144. 1900 Federal Census: Texas, Mitchell County, Justice Precinct 1, page 235B, household 275/283

45. 1910 Federal Census: Virginia, Elizabeth City, Wythe County, page 202A, household 349/353

46. FHL Collection: New Mexico Deaths; Film Number: 2032743

47. FHL Collection: Kentucky Marriages, 1785-1979; Source Film Number: 482691

48. 1910 Federal Census: Virginia, Wythe County, Fort Chiswell, page 6B, household 113/114

49. FHL Collection: North Carolina Deaths and Burials, 1898-1994; Source Film Number: 1926905

50. Bullitt County KY Deed Book 33, page 569

51. FHL Collection: Kentucky Deaths; Film Number: 209705

52. Ancestry.com. Kentucky Death Records, 1852-1953 (database on-line)

53. Waco Times-Herald, 30 Dec 1900; online at http://www.txgenweb3.org/txmclennan/EWO/f%205-19-1898%20250-3-25%2018%20%20%20299.htm

54. Brief Biographical Accounts of Many Members of the Houston Family by Samuel Rutherford Houston; Cincinnati: Elm Street Printing Company, 1882, page 41-2.

55. FHL Collection: Texas Marriages, 1837-1973; Source Film Number: 200294; marriage in Davidson Co TN

56. FHL Collection: Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1950; Source Film Number: 969847

57. Waco Times-Herald, 16 Aug 1902; online at http://www.txgenweb3.org/txmclennan/EWO/g%203-28-1901%20300-11-13-1903%20349.htm

58. 1900 Federal Census: Kentucky, Bullitt County, Shepherdsville, page 15B, household 291/294

59. FHL Collection: Texas Marriages, 1837-1973; Source Film Number: 987554

60. FHL Collection: Texas Deaths, 1890-1976; Film Number: 2116862

61. FHL Collection: Texas Deaths, 1890-1976; Film Number: 2114143

62. Waco Times-Herald, 1 Jun 1903; online at http://www.ctgs.org/CTGS%20-%20Books/EWO/CTGS_EWO%20341.pdf

63. Samuel Casseday Death Certificate: Bullitt County KY, 1914-30831

64. FHL Collection: Kentucky Marriages, 1785-1979; Source Film Number: 1929414

65. 1900 Federal Census: Kentucky, Jefferson County, Louisville Ward 12, page 115A, household 301/335

66. FHL Collection: Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1950; Source Film Number: 200318

67. 1920 Federal Census: Massachusetts, Hampden County, Springfield Ward 6, page 108B, household 179/256

68. Frederick T. Ley Obituary, New York Times, 14 Jul 1958

69. A History of Kentucky and Kentuckians: The Leaders and Representative Men in Commerce, Industry and Modern Activities by E. Polk Johnson; Volume II, Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1912, pages 966-7

70. FHL Collection: Texas Marriages, 1837-1973; Source Film Number: 987554

71. FHL Collection: Texas Deaths, 1890-1976; Film Number: 2114934

72. http://www.txgenweb3.org/txmclennan/cemetery/First_Street/First_Street_Notables_06-17-08.html


Originally published in The Wilderness Road Quarterly, September 2011. The content is copyright 2011 by Charles Hartley. All rights are reserved. No part of the content of this page may be included in any format in any place without the written permission of the copyright holder.


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